Google Slides Q&A

One of the challenges of public speaking is staying connected to your audience and ensuring that your presentation remains relevant to their needs and interests. One strategy presenters use is setting up a back channel, where audience members can ask questions and discuss the the various points introduced during the event and the presenter can then access later. Now Google has jumped on the back channel bandwagon with the introduction of Google Slides Q&A.

To access the new Q&A option:

1. Open a Google Slides presentation and then enter presentation mode.

2. Locate the ‘Presenter view’ option from the menu bar located in the bottom-left corner of the window. You can also press the ‘s’ key on the keyboard to bring up the SPEAKER NOTES tool, then switch to the AUDIENCE TOOLS tab.

Screen Shot 2016-05-30 at 3.42.43 PM

3. Here you will see the custom URL that audiences can use to submit questions during the presentation. When active, the URL will be displayed at the top of every slide in your presentation and participants can then access the Q&A tool from any device.

Screen_Shot_2016-05-30_at_3_43_57_PM

Additional Options:

  • Use the slide bar to the right to turn the Q&A feature on/off.
  • If you’re using a Google Apps for Education or Work account, you have the option to restrict access to the Q&A tool to just your domain users. Otherwise, you can set the access to ‘Anyone.’

Screen_Shot_2016-05-30_at_3_43_34_PM

Google Slides Q&A is available for any and all presenters, so students can take advantage of this tool as well. Although, I have to report that many of my students find the laser pointer tool to have a much higher “coolness” factor. For more information, please check out the post on the Google Docs Blog, and to see Slides Q&A in action check out this video on Shree Bose, winner of the first ever Google Science Fair.

 

INTEGRATION

  • Use Slides Q&A to prevent interruptions from students during a presentation while still placing value on those same questions.
  • Allow students who struggle to speak up in class to have a voice and contribute to the conversation.
  • Use this tool to help students practice crafting thoughtful questions, provide constructive criticism, and model academic commenting criteria.
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