Google Forms Update: Total Number of Points in a Quiz is Totally Cool!

Last fall our school librarian and I were tasked with creating an online Digital Citizenship curriculum for our student population in grades seven and eight. We decided to use Google Classroom to deliver the content and Google Forms with the quiz feature enabled to assess students on their comprehension. It wasn’t until a good portion of our student population had completed several of the assessments that we discovered a discrepancy in the scores being returned by Google Forms. Specifically, we failed to assign a point value to one of the quiz questions.


How it works

  • In Google Forms, click on the Settings gear icon.
  • From the pop-up window, click on the Quizzes tab.
  • Toggle the switch at the top to “Make this a quiz,” then click SAVE.

Google Forms Settings window with the QUIZZES tab active.

  • And that’s it, you’re done!

Google Forms with Quiz feature enabled showing new total points option.

The “Total points:” option:

  • Will stay visible at the top of the gForms editor as you scroll up and down through your questions.
  • Will be visible both in the QUESTIONS and the RESPONSES windows.
  • Will update automatically in real time as you assign, change, or remove point values on your questions.

Google Forms Total points feature in the RESPONSES view.


For more information on this and other recent additions to Google Forms, please check out Google’s post on The Keyword blog.

Google Forms Update: Grid Q.’s Join the Grading Bandwagon

gForms question types: linear scale, multiple choice grid, & checkbox grid.When Google introduced their quiz feature inside of Google Forms, not all of the questions types available in Forms were able to be recognized. This included both the Multiple Choice and Checkbox grid question types. Both question types are handy when you want to assess students on their ability to sort concepts into specific categories. Now Google has updated their quiz feature to support automatic grading in both question types.


How it works

  • In Google Forms, create a question and then use the drop-down menu to configure it as either a Multiple choice or Checkbox grid question. The difference between the two question types is that a Checkbox grid question will allow a student to place a checkmark in every column for each row value, while a Multiple Choice grid question will allow a student only one answer choice per row.
Checkbox grid question with multiple answers in a single row.

Checkbox grid question

Multiple choice grid question with only one answer per row.

Multiple Choice grid question

  • Configure your rows and columns with the variables and categories you want your students to evaluate. When done, go to the bottom of the question and click on the blue ANSWER KEY text to switch modes.
  • From here, you can set the correct answers for each row and/or column.
  • Note that you can also configure each row to have a specific point value. You can set the point value to any number including zero.
Checkbox Grid question with answer key and point values.

Checkbox Grid question with answer key


 

Multiple Choice Grid question with answer key and point values.

Multiple Choice Grid question with answer key


Wait! Something’s Missing…

gForms Report a problem toolThat’s right, the one thing that is missing from these question types is the ADD ANSWER FEEDBACK option. In my post from last week I talked about the awesome addition of being able to embed YouTube videos into the feedback feature of a question. Sufficed to say, I am disappointed that the feedback feature is completely missing from these two question types. Please help me get this feature added to the Multiple Choice and Checkbox grid types of questions by sending Google feedback through their Report a problem tool located in the bottom-right corner of the Forms editor window.


For more information on this and other recent additions to Google Forms, please check out Google’s post on The Keyword blog.

Google Forms Update: Give Feedback via YouTube

Feedback is an important part of the assessment process. When using Google Forms in the quiz configuration, every question comes with the option to add feedback to students for both correct and incorrect answers. In addition to text, teachers could also include a link with their feedback to anything from a website that they had used in class or perhaps a Google Doc that contains notes from a previous class discussion.  Now teachers can also embed a YouTube video into the feedback section of a question.


How it works

  • In Google Forms, create a question and add the possible answer choices.
  • When done, go to the bottom of the question and click on ANSWER KEY to switch panels.

Forms question panel with question and answer choices

  • In the ANSWER KEY panel, if you have not added feedback yet then you will see the option to ADD ANSWER FEEDBACK at the bottom.

Forms answer key without feedback yet

  • If feedback has already been provided, then click on the pencil icon to edit.

Forms answer key with feedback already added

  • On the feedback window, you have the option to add text, insert a link, and now embed a YouTube video. Clicking on the YouTube icon will open the same window seen when using the “Add video” option in Google Forms where you can search YouTube be keywords or paste a direct link into the search box.

Forms "add video" search window

  • NOTE: Depending on what type of question you have chosen, there are feedback options for both INCORRECT ANSWERS and CORRECT ANSWERS.

Forms feedback window with text and YouTube video

  • When you have finished configuring your feedback, click the SAVE button. You will return to the ANSWER KEY panel and a preview of the YouTube video you selected will be embedded below the answer choices.

Forms question with YouTube feedback added


For more information on this and other recent additions to Google Forms, please check out Google’s post on The Keyword blog.

Classroom Gets Cooler with Grade Importing from Forms

gClass&gForms shake handsFirst Google improved the communication between Google Forms and Classroom so that, when a student submitted the Form they would see an option to TURN IN the assignment (more info. here). Then Google introduced the “Quiz” feature to Google Forms with point values, pre-written feedback options, and the ability to decide when student grades would be released to them. Now, Classroom and Forms are shaking hands once again, allowing us to important grades from a quiz-enabled Form directly into a Classroom assignment.

  • When you add a Google Form to an assignment in Classroom using the Drive icon, a note and toggle switch will appear at the bottom of the window. The note explains how your Google Form quiz will be configured in order for grade importing to be carried out successfully.

import_gForms_quiz_option

  • Once the assignment has been posted, students have submitted their answers, and their responses have been assessed then you are ready to import the grades into Classroom.
  • Open the assignment, and in the top-right corner click on the IMPORT GRADES button.

Import grades from Forms2Classroom

NOTE:

  • Importing grades in this fashion will overwrite any grades previously entered.
  • If you neglected to enable grade importing before posting the assignment, then you can still use the traffic light icon (i.e. 3 vertical dots) to ‘Edit’ the post and turn on this feature.

Because this feature was announced literally just yesterday I haven’t had time to go through the process yet with one of my classes. However, I do have an assessment ready to go and will be posting it later today. And then, we’ll see what happens!

Please refer to the Google Education Help Article and look under the Grade and return an assignment to a student section for more information.

Google Forms Gets Cozy With Classroom

gClassroom add menuIn my Digital Citizenship class, I sometimes use a Google Form as an assessment tool with my students. While a Google Form cannot be embedded into Google Classroom’s Stream (soon Google, yes?), one can easily attach the link to the live form. The first time I did this I posted the Form link as an Announcement, but then couldn’t tell when students actually completed the assessment. The second time around I posted the Form link as part of an Assignment, but while students remembered to ‘Submit’ the completed Form many forgot to ‘Turn In’ the assignment in Classroom. Now, I realize that I could just open up the Form Responses spreadsheet to check for completion, but I was so hoping for a more…efficient way to spot-check completion. That’s when Google does what it does best: change.

Assignment attachment optionsLast week in the Google for Education feed on Google Plus, they announced improved integration between Classroom and Forms (click here for the post). Now you can attach a Google Form to an assignment in Classroom (i.e. forgo the paper clip option and instead choose ‘Attach Google Drive Item’).  Then, when students go to submit your Form, they will be prompted to also TURN IN the assignment in Classroom. As an added bonus, when teachers go to the Google Forms assignment in Classroom there is now a direct link to the Form Responses spreadsheet.

 

View_Responses_in_Sheets

Sometimes you just have to embrace “Living in Beta.”

Make a Prompt (Gr. K-12)

girl_thinking_TMake a Prompt is a simple web tool that allows you to poll an audience and collect data from their responses. Setup your prompt in three easy steps:

  1. Upload an image
  2. Write a prompt (i.e. finish the sentence, “Drag the red dot to…”)
  3. Give access to the link provided to your audience

The fourth step produces a link for you to access the results collected from your audiences responses. NOTE: Make sure you save both the link to the prompt and to the prompt responses as there is no way to retrieve them once you navigate away from the page.

Here is an example:

Shows a U.S. map with red dot responses

EXTENSION

  • Embed the student URL into a Google Form question as a way to enhance your list of question types. Even better, you could embed the responses URL into a Google Form and ask students to analyze the data collected. Or, you could just embed a screenshot of the responses map into your form question using the insert image tool.
  • Make a Prompt will work on an iOS device…sort of. Trying to grab the red dot from the top-left corner of the image is not as easy as you might think. Reverse-pinching the image to scale it larger before grabbing the red dot is recommended.

Google Apps: Insert Images Into Google Forms

Google Forms – Assessments that now can include images

It has been over a year since my school district integrated Google Apps for Education into our system, and since then I’ve been working to see how I can apply their tools to help enhance my computer literacy curriculum. One aspect of Google Drive (also knows as Google Docs) that I really like is their Google Forms. In addition to basic data collection, I’ve used Google Forms to conduct project assessments, pre and post quizzes, and collect feedback from students on how an assignment or unit went. However, one component that was sorely missing from Google Forms was the ability to insert images into questions…until now.

Thanks to Richard Byrne over at FreeTech4Teachers.com, I learned that images are now an available component that can be inserted into a Google Form question. This new feature opens up so many possibilites for expanding the use of the Forms, such as map screenshots for students to identify geographic features or venn diagrams for students to analyze. Anything that you can take a screenshot of is fair game. If a screenshot will not do, perhaps because the component is interactive or is a video, you could try creating a QR code that links to the component for students to access from a mobile device. The point is, if you can get it in an image then you can integrate it into your Google Form.

If you’d like to learn more, head on over to FreeTech4Teachers.com for more information and a video tutorial that shows you how easy adding images to a Google Form is. You should also check out Brent Catlett‘s blog, Cat’s Chronicles, where he provides written directions with accompanying screenshots on how the process works.

RESOURCES

Website of the Week: Cuban Missle Crisis (Gr. 6-12)

Cuban Missile Crisis – Role-play as President JFK

This simple and straight-forward site asks students to sit in the ‘big chair’ as President John F. Kennedy at the time when the United States was facing the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962. Students will need to consult with each of their cabinet of advisers to get their perspective on the matter by navigating the image map on the page. Students should also consult the brief put together by the CIA. Finally, based on the data they have collected students must choose from five possible actions to take.

INTEGRATE

  • Use this site to develop personalities and scripts in order to role-play the event in the classroom. Have students gather research on the major players so that they may better portray them in the simulation.
  • Ask students to hypothesize  how our current president might have handled the situation differently.

A screenshot of the main page with the 5 possible choices listed

Website of the Week: Quia Web

Quia Web –  Quintessential Instructional Archive

Quia Web is an archive of interactive tools and assessments for teachers to create and students to use to help enhance understanding and check for comprehension. Choose from up to 16 types of online activities to insert your content into and then share. Before you re-invent the wheel, check out their archive of shared activities organized into over 100 sub-categories ranging from American History to French and Greek to Speech Therapy and more. A site account (FREE) is required to create content and/or bookmark activities you’d like to save for later.

INTEGRATE

  • Many of these activities are simple and would be great for both an introduction activity as well as for review.
  • Below are screenshots from two Technology games I found on Internet Safety: Hangman and Battleship!

Hangman

Battleship!